The European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) has elected Eörs Szathmáry, Director General of the Centre for Ecological Research at the Eötvös Loránd Research Network, as a life member. Eörs Szathmáry is among the 63 leading researchers in the world whose outstanding achievements in the field of life sciences have been rewarded with life membership to the prestigious organization.

The EMBO’s scientific community of 1,800 members, including 88 Nobel Prize-winning researchers, may be joined this year by 52 new members and an additional 11 associate members from 25 countries around the world. The researchers elected as members of the organization owe their membership to their outstanding achievements, and their selection is based on scientific excellence and pioneering research. The newly elected members are pursuing research in many areas of the life sciences, including neuroscience, plant biology, cell biology, signal transduction, development, molecular medicine, and immunology.

“The new Members have contributed to the success of research in the life sciences in Europe and around the world,” said EMBO Director Maria Leptin. “As EMBO Members they can help to shape the future through EMBO’s work to support talented researchers, bring ideas together, and promote an international research environment conducive to excellent science.”

EMBO Members actively participate in EMBO initiatives, for example by serving on EMBO Council and committees, by mentoring young scientists, or supporting activities such as the promotion of sound science policy. Members also guide and support the organisation in ensuring the highest quality in the selection of future members, postdoctoral fellows, and courses and workshops.

The 52 new EMBO Members reside in 18 Member States of the European Molecular Biology Conference (EMBC), EMBO’s intergovernmental funding body. The 11 new Associate Members are currently based in Australia, Canada, Chile, India, Japan, Singapore, and the United States.

EMBO’s tradition of recognising outstanding life scientists as Members dates back to 1963, when an initial group of 150 Members were selected by EMBO’s Council. Since then, EMBO Members have been invited to nominate and elect exceptional researchers to join the community, which now exceeds 1,800 Members and Associate Members.

Source: www.embo.org