Strategic partnership between Széchenyi István University and the Eötvös Loránd Research Network

The rector of Széchenyi István University (SZE) in Győr, Péter Földesi, and its Chancellor, Bálint Filep, Director of the Institute for Computer Science & Control (SZTAKI) belonging to the Eötvös Loránd Research Network (ELKH), László Monostori, and on behalf of the Secretariat of the Eötvös Loránd Research Network (ELKHT), Miklós Maróth, President of the Governing Board of ELKH, have signed a strategic partnership agreement. The strategic partnership offers a number of mutual benefits for the parties. It supports the widest possible social and economic exploitation of basic research results by encouraging collaboration between members of the R&D and innovation ecosystem.

At the same time, the strategic cooperation serves as a model for the establishment of dynamic program partnerships and integrated research collaborations between universities ranked in leading positions on international lists and the ELKH institution network, which can now join and actively participate in large-scale international R&D networks.

A SZTAKI Ipar 4.0 laborja a SZE győri épületében

Image: the SZTAKI Industry 4.0 lab in the SZE building in Győr

The initiative is closely aligned with ongoing collaborations between ELKH research sites, groups and universities, including higher education, joint research and joint applications, and the sharing of research infrastructure. Strategic partnerships with universities help make research careers more attractive, promote the supply of researchers, improve the international visibility of universities and research network institutions, and encourage research and innovation activities involving industry partners.

This year, Széchenyi István University has been included in the latest Times Higher Education (THE) list, which ranks the world’s universities according to the 17 sustainable development goals set by the United Nations, including economic and social impact and the social responsibility of institutions. Through this partnership, the university is expected to further strengthen its position in this and other highly prestigious university rankings. It also provides substantial support to the university in increasing its participation in international mobility programs, which heavily promote the acquisition of student and research talent. All this will help the university attain prominent positions in international rankings as, in addition to the quality of teaching and good practices at the university, the evaluation takes into account the research and innovation activities the university is involved in, as well as the number of scientific publications and indicators of excellence. The results achieved in the THE ranking also show Győr and its surrounding region maintaining and even improving its position against prominent rivals such as Vienna, Bratislava and Wrocław, when it comes to innovation.

dr. Paniti Imre, a SZTAKI tudományos munkatársa a győri egyetemi laborban

Image: SZTAKI research fellow Dr Imre Paniti in the university lab in Győr

SZTAKI and SZE have been successfully cooperating for years in the field of automotive research and cyberphysics manufacturing and logistics systems at the University’s Automotive Research Center. The research institute contributes to world-class automotive research in Győr through the results of exploratory research while also supporting typically regional technical and scientific R&D&I activities through its presence. One of the hubs for this collaboration is the Center of Excellence in Vehicle Technology Research (J3K) established by the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and hosted by the Széchényi István University in Győr. In recent years, its operation has been funded by the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Audi Hungaria, the University and the city of Győr. Additionally, SZTAKI has a site in one of the SZE buildings in Győr where the two institutions operate a model Industry 4.0 system primarily focusing on robotics. The long-term stability and effectiveness of the research is also ensured by the University’s ongoing Thematic Excellence Program, which apart from vehicle technology and Industry 4.0, also incorporated the precision crop production research taking place in Mosonmagyaróvár among its key topics. The program developments carried out by the Center for Higher Education and Industrial Cooperation (FIEK), which implements R&D projects in the automotive, information technology and telecommunications industries, serve the same purpose. These are intended to boost the innovation capacity of SMEs in the region.

In addition to outstanding scholarship opportunities, a further attraction for talented students will be the ability to test research and development work on electric vehicle propulsion for self-driving vehicles being carried out in Győr on the ZalaZONE Automotive Test Track, which is currently under construction. As a key element of talent management, the University and Test Track provide a special opportunity for all three university student competition teams (SZEnergy Team, Arrabona Racing Team, SZEngine – Formula Student Team) to prepare for world-class competitions under professional conditions. Researchers from Széchenyi István University and SZTAKI also provide effective support for these preparations.

Through its Framework Program for Excellence, the ELKH Secretariat helps coordinate the priority research projects of universities with the EHEA’s strategic scientific programs. The Secretariat is currently preparing a scheme to support grant applications that will increase the chances of successful application for EU innovation tenders, either individually or as part of a consortium. Joint application opportunities and joint research contribute to the development and reinforcement of the country’s R&D and innovation ecosystem. Apart from promoting the wider economic and social utilization of research results, this will support Hungary in its efforts to be at the forefront of R&D and innovation in Europe and the world by bolstering scientific excellence.

Media Conact:

Éva Hencz
Head of Communications Department
hencz.eva[at]elkh.org
+36 30 155 1803
Eötvös Loránd Research Network

Strategic partnership between Széchenyi István University and the Eötvös Loránd Research Network

The rector of Széchenyi István University (SZE) in Győr, Péter Földesi, and its Chancellor, Bálint Filep, Director of the Institute for Computer Science & Control (SZTAKI) belonging to the Eötvös Loránd Research Network (ELKH), László Monostori, and on behalf of the Secretariat of the Eötvös Loránd Research Network (ELKHT), Miklós Maróth, President of the Governing Board of ELKH, have signed a strategic partnership agreement. The strategic partnership offers a number of mutual benefits for the parties. It supports the widest possible social and economic exploitation of basic research results by encouraging collaboration between members of the R&D and innovation ecosystem.

At the same time, the strategic cooperation serves as a model for the establishment of dynamic program partnerships and integrated research collaborations between universities ranked in leading positions on international lists and the ELKH institution network, which can now join and actively participate in large-scale international R&D networks.

Image: the SZTAKI Industry 4.0 lab in the SZE building in Győr

The initiative is closely aligned with ongoing collaborations between ELKH research sites, groups and universities, including higher education, joint research and joint applications, and the sharing of research infrastructure. Strategic partnerships with universities help make research careers more attractive, promote the supply of researchers, improve the international visibility of universities and research network institutions, and encourage research and innovation activities involving industry partners.

This year, Széchenyi István University has been included in the latest Times Higher Education (THE) list, which ranks the world’s universities according to the 17 sustainable development goals set by the United Nations, including economic and social impact and the social responsibility of institutions. Through this partnership, the university is expected to further strengthen its position in this and other highly prestigious university rankings. It also provides substantial support to the university in increasing its participation in international mobility programs, which heavily promote the acquisition of student and research talent. All this will help the university attain prominent positions in international rankings as, in addition to the quality of teaching and good practices at the university, the evaluation takes into account the research and innovation activities the university is involved in, as well as the number of scientific publications and indicators of excellence. The results achieved in the THE ranking also show Győr and its surrounding region maintaining and even improving its position against prominent rivals such as Vienna, Bratislava and Wrocław, when it comes to innovation.

Image: SZTAKI research fellow Dr Imre Paniti in the university lab in Győr

SZTAKI and SZE have been successfully cooperating for years in the field of automotive research and cyberphysics manufacturing and logistics systems at the University’s Automotive Research Center. The research institute contributes to world-class automotive research in Győr through the results of exploratory research while also supporting typically regional technical and scientific R&D&I activities through its presence. One of the hubs for this collaboration is the Center of Excellence in Vehicle Technology Research (J3K) established by the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and hosted by the Széchényi István University in Győr. In recent years, its operation has been funded by the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Audi Hungaria, the University and the city of Győr. Additionally, SZTAKI has a site in one of the SZE buildings in Győr where the two institutions operate a model Industry 4.0 system primarily focusing on robotics. The long-term stability and effectiveness of the research is also ensured by the University’s ongoing Thematic Excellence Program, which apart from vehicle technology and Industry 4.0, also incorporated the precision crop production research taking place in Mosonmagyaróvár among its key topics. The program developments carried out by the Center for Higher Education and Industrial Cooperation (FIEK), which implements R&D projects in the automotive, information technology and telecommunications industries, serve the same purpose. These are intended to boost the innovation capacity of SMEs in the region.

In addition to outstanding scholarship opportunities, a further attraction for talented students will be the ability to test research and development work on electric vehicle propulsion for self-driving vehicles being carried out in Győr on the ZalaZONE Automotive Test Track, which is currently under construction. As a key element of talent management, the University and Test Track provide a special opportunity for all three university student competition teams (SZEnergy Team, Arrabona Racing Team, SZEngine – Formula Student Team) to prepare for world-class competitions under professional conditions. Researchers from Széchenyi István University and SZTAKI also provide effective support for these preparations.

Through its Framework Program for Excellence, the ELKH Secretariat helps coordinate the priority research projects of universities with the EHEA’s strategic scientific programs. The Secretariat is currently preparing a scheme to support grant applications that will increase the chances of successful application for EU innovation tenders, either individually or as part of a consortium. Joint application opportunities and joint research contribute to the development and reinforcement of the country’s R&D and innovation ecosystem. Apart from promoting the wider economic and social utilization of research results, this will support Hungary in its efforts to be at the forefront of R&D and innovation in Europe and the world by bolstering scientific excellence.

Coronavirus may also affect the functioning of brain

Researchers from the internationally recognized Institute for Experimental Medicine (KOKI) are studying the effects of the Covid-19 virus on the brain and nervous system in neural tissue samples from deceased patients. Their findings may also bring new approaches to treatment.

The Covid-19 virus is known around the world as a respiratory disease, yet there are growing signs that it can also have a negative effect on other organs, including the nervous system and brain. One of KOKI’s research groups, in collaboration with the neuropathologist Tibor Hortobágyi, have undertaken to map these effects under the leadership of Ádám Dénes. The team was among the first to begin preparations and the approval process for the examination of nerve tissue samples from patients who died of Covid-19. Their goal is to establish if the virus can infect the nervous system and, if so, which areas of the brain may be affected. They also study how local or systemic inflammatory processes caused by a viral infection affect the brain.

As a result of infections, foreign substances that enter the body trigger an inflammatory reaction that travels to different parts of the body through blood circulation. The body then switches to ’emergency mode’ and retunes its normally functioning system. The ‘news’ of inflammatory changes also reaches the brain, in response to which a sense of illness develops. In severe cases, inflammatory factors are overproduced and processes are initiated that can affect the brain centers of respiration and circulation. This is also evidenced by Covid-19 cases in which patients’ breathing collapsed despite the fact that the condition of the lungs did not justify it, while there were also reports that critically low respiratory surface area and low blood oxygen levels did not cause shortness of breath in those infected.

These symptoms may also indicate that the virus is able to enter the brain, as are its ‘relatives’, MERS and SARS. Loss of taste and smell, headache, confusion, sudden onset of fever, stroke, seizures, and convulsions all suggest that Covid-19 can also cause an infection of the nervous system. This assumption is also supported by the network analysis research of Albert-László Barabási, which aims to explore the relationship between human and coronavirus proteins.

KOKI’s research will enable us to understand the effects of the virus on the brain, so new perspectives can be explored in terms of treatment. It is conceivable that some antiviral agents could improve patients’ chances by reducing cerebral viral infection, though it would also be possible to target inhibition of viral-induced inflammatory cerebral inflammatory processes with drugs already on the market to treat other diseases. In addition, the study of the long-term nervous system effects of infection and associated inflammatory processes may be critical to understanding or rehabilitating patients’ mental status and to determining whether infection may increase the risk of developing various cerebrovascular or neurodegenerative diseases.

New book by Pál Fodor on Türbe City

A new volume has just been published by Pál Fodor – General Director of the Research Centre for the Humanities, research advisor of the Institute of History – entitled “Turbék. Szulejmán Szultán szigetvári Türbevárosa a 16–17. századi oszmán–török forrásokban” [Türbes. Sultan Suleiman’s Türbe City in Szigetvár from 16th-17th century Ottoman-Turkish sources]. 

Historical reconstruction of Sultan Suleiman’s tomb chapel on the Turbék vineyard near Szigetvár. Edited by: Norbert Pap and Máté Kitanics

The Ottoman Sultan Suleiman embarked on his 13th military campaign on 29 April 1566, at the age of 72, with the aim of occupying as many of the three Hungarian “strongholds” – Szigetvár, Eger and Gyula – as possible that most threatened Ottoman-occupied lands and stabilize the Principality of Transylvania under his patronage once and for all.

The sultan arrived in Szigetvár with his army on August 9, setting up his ornate tent city on a vineyard east of the castle. However, he was unable to celebrate success on this occasion as he died on 7 September, a few hours before the Turkish army occupied the castle after the heroic deaths of Miklós Zrínyi, the castle captain of Szigetvár, and his remaining soldiers. A memorial türbe (tomb chapel) was built in the sultans honor in the mid-1570s on the site of Suleiman’s tent city in Szigetvár, where the ruler’s corpse lay in the ground for 42 days. Later, new buildings – mosques, dervish monasteries, barracks, protective planking – were built around it. The former campsite became a popular place of worship and pilgrimage in the Ottoman world.

After the Ottoman Turks were driven out, the shrine was destroyed, but the locals remembered it for many centuries. It was only in the 20th century that is location was finally forgotten. Pál Fodor’s new volume provides an insight into how “Türbe City” was founded and operated.

A detailed description of the book is available here: https://cutt.ly/6uT2dpB

László Keviczky receives this year’s Gold Medal from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Keviczky László

The Hungarian Academy of Sciences Gold Medal has this year been awarded to László Keviczky, a researcher at the Institute for Computer Science & Control (SZTAKI) and a full member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, who has helped to advance science as a teacher, researcher, editor of a scientific journal, head of an institution and a member of several other professional organizations. The research professor at SZTAKI has produced significant results in the field of control theory and its applications, as well as in the automation of industrial processes and systems. In addition, he has greatly contributed to the development of a domestic research culture in systems and management theory and integrating it into the international scientific scene.

 

 

Three other researchers in the ELKH research network have also been honored with an award of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences:

  • Zoltán Bajnok, scientific advisor at the Wigner Research Centre for Physics, doctor of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences,
  • Krisztián Bányai, Head of the “Lendület” Research Group on the Detection of New Pathogens at the Institute for Veterinary Medical Research, Centre for Agricultural Research,
  • and Tibor Neumann, Senior Research Fellow, Institute of History, Research Centre for the Humanities.

Zoltán Bajnok, Krisztián Bányai, Tibor Neumann

New exotic atom created by ASACUSA Program researchers

A new type of exotic atom, a pionic helium atom was created and examined by members of the ASACUSA Program running at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The results of the measurements were first published in the scientific journal Nature. Two Hungarians are among the authors of the article: Dániel Barna, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Budapest and Anna Sótér, ETH, Zürich. This achievement is seen as a breakthrough, as although the existence of this atom had already been predicted, its existence had not been proven till now. The creation of the new atom was identified with the help of a laser device at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI).

A measurement system known as the Antimatter Factory has been operated by CERN since 1999. This is where antimatter was first created and exact spectroscopy measurements were carried out on it. One of the projects pursued here is the ASACUSA Program, headed by Japanese researchers. Besides Austrian, German and Italian research groups, a team of Hungarian researchers from the Wigner Institute, Budapest and Atomki, Debrecen were the founders of the Program. “There are several first discoveries and experiments among the successes of the project, including proof that apart from the sign of their electric charge, all the properties of a proton and its corresponding antimatter particle, the antiproton, are identical to a very high degree,” writes Dezső Horváth, a researcher at the Wigner Institute, discussing the new results. Dezső Horváth was among the founding fathers of the Program, working in the project for several years.

Measurements have been performed for two decades on this long-lived exotic atom, which is made up of an atomic nucleus of helium, an electron and an antiproton, i.e., one of the electrons of the helium is replaced by a negatively charged antiproton. In the cold atom, the antiproton was moved between relatively stable and unstable states with a fine tuned laser beam. A recent idea research workers had was to test whether a novel exotic atom can be created using negative pions. One of the leaders of the ASACUSA experiment, Masaki Hori arranged for the construction of a special measurement device at CERN. The apparatus was later transported to the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zürich, where the largest capacity pion source in the world is operated. The aim of the experiment was to determine the weight of pions more precisely than before, in a similar manner to the weighing of antiprotons. The biggest challenge was, however, the short lifespan of pions. In contrast to stable antiprotons, a pion decays in 26 nanoseconds. In the course of the experiment, negative pions were fed by a magnetic field into the target containing superfluid helium cooled down to almost absolute zero.

During the experiment, a pion was inserted into the helium atom, which replaced one of the two electrons. In the next step, the helium atom containing the pion was excited by laser, which caused the atomic nucleus to absorb the pion, and in turn the nucleus decomposed into its particles. The creation of the helium atom containing the pion was identified by a finely tuned laser: at a certain frequency the pion was absorbed through resonance by the helium’s atomic nucleus, which led to an explosion, i.e., the nucleus decomposed into smaller particles in a similar manner to atomic fission. Researchers identified the following particles in the experiment after the decomposition: proton, neutron and deuteron (i.e., a stable particle composed of a proton and a neutron).

Now the researchers aim to make the measurement of the laser transition even more precise in order to determine the weight of a pion. According to their preliminary calculations, this method can increase accuracy a hundred times, which could effectively test the Standard Model of particle physics.

Researcher at Wigner Research Centre for Physics Wins CERN CMS Achievement Award

In April 2020, as the only Hungarian awardee, Frigyes János Nemes, assistant research fellow of the Wigner Research Centre for Physics (Wigner Centre), a member of the Eötvös Loránd Research Network, won the CERN CMS Achievement Award in acknowledgement of his innovative work in 2019 (CERN: European Organization for Nuclear Research).

The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of the detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) built for particle physics research purposes. The device, located in Cessy, France, near the Swiss border, is 21 m long, has a diameter of 15 m and weighs 14,000 tons, and is used in the major international experiment in which Frigyes János Nemes participates. The Wigner Centre scientist deserved the 2019 CMS Achievement Award for his innovative determination of the LHC optics from Precision Proton Spectrometer (PPS) data. The method elaborated by the Hungarian scientist has become a key ingredient for all CMS experimental analyses based on PPS information, which is a significant result in such a crucial international project.

In the middle: Frigyes János Nemes, on the left: Harrison Prosper (FSU), CMS Collaboration Board Chair, on the left: Roberto Carlin, CMS spokesperson

The CMS Achievement Award was founded in 2007 in order to honor the individual achievement of researchers participating in international projects. It illustrates the prestige of the award that out of the 15 thousand workers at CERN, nearly 5500 people are involved in the CMS experiment, out of whom only 28 researchers won this award this year.

Frigyes János Nemes is an assistant research fellow in the Femtoscopy Research Group at the Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics. He earned his PhD at ELTE University under the supervision of Tamás Csörgő of the Wigner Centre and Eszterházy Károly University and Máté Csanád of ELTE University. Frigyes János Nemes is a Hungarian member of CERN’s CMS and TOTEM experiments at the LHC accelerator.

The winners of the CMS Achievement Award 2019